Chinese Tea Culture

Posted by Red Saga Seeds Singapore on

The Chinese tea culture has a really long history. The concept of tea culture is referred to in mandarin as chayi ("the art of drinking tea"), or cha wenhua ("tea culture"). 

Chinese tea culture refers to how tea is prepared as well as the occasions when people consume tea in China. Tea Culture n China differs from that in European countries like Britain and other Asian countries in preparation, taste, and occasion when it is consumed. Tea is still consumed regularly, both on casual and formal occasions. Tea is also used in the traditional chinese medicine and chinese cuisine as well. 

Chinese clay teapots do not use glazing. The clay used remains porous and tea oils are intended to build up inside the teapot and over time, smooth the taste of tea and improve it by adding its own unique “taste” from the accumulated oils. Different teas are not made in the same teapot unless they are from the same family or class of teas, such as different types of green or oolongs, but even this is not ideal as some teas from the same family have a strong flavour and in time, their taste can transfer to a more delicately flavoured tea.

Tea is prepared and consumed during special occasions and circumstances: 

A sign of respect
In traditional Chinese society, members of the younger generation show their respect to members of the older generation by offering a cup of tea. Inviting their elders to restaurants for tea is a traditional holiday activity. In the past, people of a lower social class served tea to the upper class in society. Today, with the increasing liberalization of Chinese society, this rule and its connotations have become blurred. Sometimes parents may pour a cup of tea for their children to show their care, or a boss may even pour tea for subordinates at restaurants to promote their relationship; however, on formal occasions, the basic rule remains in effect.
Family gatherings
When sons and daughters leave home for work or marriage, they may spend less time with their parents; therefore, going to restaurants and drinking tea becomes an important activity to reestablish ties at family gatherings. Every Sunday, Chinese restaurants are crowded with families, especially during the holiday season, for this reason. This phenomenon reflects the function of tea in Chinese family values.
To apologize
In Chinese culture, tea may be offered as part of a formal apology. For example, children who have misbehaved may serve tea to their parents as a sign of regret and submission.
To show gratitude and celebrate weddings
In the traditional Chinese Marriage Ceremony the bride and groom kneel in front of their respective parents and serve them tea and then thank them, which is a devout way to express their gratitude for being raised. On some occasions, the bride serves the groom's family, and the groom serves the bride's family. This process symbolizes the joining together of the two families.

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